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  • Rituals In Oriya Wedding

    By: Palak Gupta | In: Hindu Marriages | Last Updated: 2012-08-17
    An Oriya Wedding reflects the culture of the people of Orissa and takes place over several days. Though a few rituals in Oriya Weddings differ as per the caste for e.g. Brahmins conduct it during day time and others during evening or night time but most of the rituals are the same.

    The rituals start with the distribution of the wedding invitation and the first one is presented before the Lord Jagannath, highly revered by the Oriya community. After this, the rest of the people are sent the card. After this, Mangana takes place where the bride is smeared with Turmeric/Haldi paste and takes a ceremonial bath. Then Dian Mangula Puja is done where the deity of the village is worshipped while a barber's wife gives the bangles, toe ring, sindura and sari of the bride to the Goddess to invoke her and seek blessings for a blissful marital life.

    Later in the day or night, the procession from the Groom's side (Barjatri) arrives at the marriage venue. The bride is informed about this and takes another ceremonial bath as part of the Baadua Pani Gadhua custom.

    The main wedding rituals start with the Kanyadaan custom where the father formally gives away his daughter to the groom. After this, Hata Ganthi takes place in front of a holy fire amidst chanting of mantras. Saptapadi or seven steps are then taken by the bride and groom around the fire and seven mounts of rice representing saptakulaparwata. Then they toss Khoi or rice puffs into the fire as a sacrifice to the fire god. The groom then puts vermillion on the bride's forehead and with this, the wedding is complete.

    After the Oriya Wedding Ceremonies are over, the bride leaves for her new home along with the spouse and is given a warm welcome by her husband's family as part of Girhaprabesh ritual. After eight days, the couple is invited to the girl's home for a delicious feast as part of the Ashta Mangala custom.
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